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Zoom – 8 Jul 2021

Out In The Open: Public Art from Chillida to Nevelson

On the occasion of the exhibition ‘Eduardo Chillida’, Hauser & Wirth has collaborated with Chillida Leku, Drawing Matter and the Architecture Foundation to discuss topics raised by public sculpture. Our guests Nicholas Olsberg, Adrian Forty and Nausica Sanchez will share presentations on their responses to the topic, and we are delighted that Niall Hobhouse will chair the discussion.

About Drawing Matter
Drawing Matter is an organisation that explores the role of drawing in architectural thought and practice. Their inquiries have been presented as exhibitions, publications, public events, and workshops for students and practitioners.

About Chillida Leku
Chillida Leku is a unique museum, made in itself as a great work of art. In it, the fusion between art and nature occurs in a natural way. The sculptures are integrated into the landscape as if they had always been part of it. In the garden, beech, oak and magnolia trees coexist with monumental steel and granite sculptures located in perfect dialogue with the environment.

About Architecture Foundation
The Architecture Foundation leads the conversation on the development of London and contributes to a global discourse about the architect’s changing role and responsibilities. They pursue this mission through the delivery of an accessible public programme that makes space for emerging architects, groups historically underrepresented in the profession, and representatives of a wide range of related disciplines. Exploring the architect’s capacity to combat climate change and systemic social inequalities represent central concerns of the programme.

About Eduardo Chillida
One of the foremost Spanish sculptors of the twentieth century, Eduardo Chillida (1924 – 2002) is widely celebrated for his monumental public sculptures and enduring fascination with interconnected shape, space and organic form. Chillida challenged the constraints of materials such as iron and steel to redefine the language of postwar sculpture, drawing on a deep connection to his native Basque region. Chillida’s public sculptures were commissioned globally and he travelled extensively to Paris, Greece, Umbria, Tuscany, Rome and Provence, each informing new artistic paths.

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